Volume versus significance

Ever since Google hit it big with its search tool and then made an enormous amount of cash via advertising, the tech world has been fascinated with scaling. Projects that scale, like Facebook, Twitter, and on and on, make oodles of money and are the darlings of the world. Things that don’t scale are failures.

And if you are trying to change the world, this is understandable. You don’t change the world by blogging to ten people each day about what you made for dinner last night. But … the above train of thought is missing something.

It is missing something BIG. Consider, for example, how Christianity got its start. Jesus did not attempt a mass conversion. Instead, he found 12 apostles. And for those 12, Jesus was incredibly significant. They hung on his every word. In other words, he did not try to scale. He went for high impact in a niche market.

Can that translate into a 21st century business strategy? Check out what Micheala Clark has to say.

I’m Michaela. I write a blog for trades and building contractors.  I have less than a 1000 visitors a month and I still make money from blogging.

She makes money by offering something of high value to this group — that she alone caters to.

In less than 12 months and with only a handful of readers, I now have over 10 different revenue streams that are all a direct result of the content I am producing.

This additional revenue has been gained through sponsored posts, event sponsorships, podcast sponsorship,  affiliate deals, a membership site, product integrations, speaking and consulting. This is all in addition to the core VA services my business offers.

The key point I quickly realised was that potential partners and sponsors weren’t too concerned with my seemingly ‘low’ traffic numbers but rather the opportunity I gave them to speak directly to a highly relevant and engaged section of their target market.

I call this being “hyper local”. It is the next wave.

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